Things parents should not tell children during divorce

On Behalf of | Dec 29, 2021 | Divorce

The divorce process can bring about a range of emotions from the spouses going through it, as well as their children. Since the process can be an emotionally challenging time, parents in Winston-Salem and elsewhere may sometimes speak despairingly about their soon-to-be ex. However, parents should be respect their children’s love for their other parent, and they should avoid discussing certain matters in front of the children to help safeguard their mental and emotional well-being. 

Statements to avoid 

The first thing parents should keep in mind is to keep children out of adult conversations regarding the divorce and the reasons for the divorce. Some children may be too young to understand, and hearing their parents argue may only intensify their negative emotions. Likewise, parents should not speak badly about the other parent in front of the children, as doing so may lead to parental alienation. 

Another thing parents should avoid is blaming the children for the parent’s divorce. Parents should not say things regarding a child’s behavior as a leading cause of the breakup or some similar statement. Doing so can greatly affect a child’s self-esteem as they will likely always blame themselves for their parent’s divorce. 

Maintain civility and move on 

While it is true the divorce process is a highly emotional process, parents should try to remain civil toward each other for their own safety as well as the well-being of their children. If a divorcing couple can remain amicable enough with each other to work through issues, they can use mediation or some other form of alternative dispute resolution to come up with child custody agreements and other agreements. Whether seeking a contested or uncontested divorce, parents in Winston-Salem will want to work with an experienced family law attorney to help them protect their rights and achieve the most favorable outcomes possible regarding their divorces. 

 

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