Careful consumption during the holidays

On Behalf of | Nov 3, 2021 | Drunk Driving

Finding a happy medium between enjoying a party and avoiding a DWI can seem impossible, especially during the holidays. In addition to the increase in parties and social gatherings, it can be challenging to schedule a sober ride since more people are looking for the same times.

When you are on your way home from a holiday gathering, the last thing you want to see is flashing lights in your rearview mirror. Going through the process of a DWI charge can have serious (and expensive) consequences.

Here’s what you should know about holiday DWIs and getting home safely.

One drink might be too much

The trouble with assessing how much you had to drink by counting how many drinks you had is that it can be incredibly inaccurate. Charts and articles that compare “one drink” assuming a certain amount and percentage of alcohol in the drink.

However, at holiday parties, hosts and guests serving as amateur bartenders might pour more generous drinks. This can be incredibly deceiving with mixed drinks, especially sweet cocktails.

Instead of the one glass of a drink, you may be consuming the equivalent of two or more drinks. When you have a few “generously poured” drinks during the night, you might not realize how impaired you are because you did not have all the information about your consumption.

Have a backup plan

In some cases, you may plan for a friend to give you a ride, but they back out at the last moment. Or, your sober ride might make an alternate arrangement without telling you, leaving you without a ride.

If you plan on drinking at a holiday party, know what alternatives are available in your area for ridesharing or other options.

During this year’s Fourth of July and Labor Day holidays, officers set up DWI roadblocks to catch drunk drivers. There will likely be checkpoints for the winter holidays, too.

Keep in mind, even if you feel like you are ok to drive, you could run into a sobriety checkpoint where an officer with a  breathalyzer comes to a different conclusion.

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