Stand your ground laws enable you to defend yourself in various situations with the use of deadly force. Most often, this means using a firearm, which usually results in the death of the other person. Because there is the possibility of death, these laws are quite strict in application. The bottom line is that if your case falls under this law and you did kill someone, the prosecutor will see it as a justifiable homicide. However, it is important that you understand when the stand your ground law applies in North Carolina.

The Dispatch explains that you may use deadly force if you have a legitimate fear that the person will cause you serious injury or is trying to kill you. You may only use it in a situation where the person breaks into or is otherwise unlawfully in your home, workplace or vehicle. This is worth noting because people often confuse stand your ground laws and castle doctrines. A stand your ground law differs from a castle doctrine in that the stand your ground law applies to situations in places other than your home. A castle doctrine only applies in your home.

You do not have to try to get away from the person before using deadly force. This is something of a debated point. However, most stand your ground laws in almost all states do not require that you try to get away from the situation first. If you feel threatened in a serious way, you can do what you need to do to protect yourself, your family and your property.